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How to Coach as a Parent

Your child wants to get into throwing. Finally, your dream is coming true. Your kid can develop into one of the nation’s best throwers. Proudly standing next to the circle, you can guide them through all of their technical development, all of their strength development, and are by their side as they conquer the world of throws.


But is it really that simple? Is it really that easy to develop a thrower within a parent/child relationship? Surely, there are many roadblocks standing in front of the parent/child dream. What can we expect and look for as we develop the athletic relationship?


No Coach?!?!?! No Problem!

For many parents, being able to coach their child is a dream. They have done a good job raising their child, they love their kid tremendously and obviously they know what is best for their development. This is evident in many sports. Think about the crazy soccer parents standing by the pitch, screaming instructions for their ball hawk. Or the football dad’s who insist their kid MUST be in the all-star quarterback on their mighty-mites football team in FIRST grade. In Pennsylvania, it’s even common to see parents sitting next to a wrestling mat, screaming instructions to their kid while they ignore the demands of their educated coach!


The same can be said of many throwers and their parents. An intelligent throws coach can be difficult to find at times and jumping in as the parent/coach can be quite intriguing. Look at the success Sam Mattis and his father had in high school and college! But is everyone as calm and level headed as Marlon Mattis? There are multiple KEYS behind finding success as a parent/coach, let’s dive deep into the topic!


1. Establish a TRAINING STRUCTURE


Parents love to give their kid 20 different cues during training. Every single throw they have a new cue, a new feeling, a new goal. This is never a positive situation. Instead, the thrower struggles to find any consistent movement, they struggle to find any rhythm and they end up getting frustrated. This frustration leads to angst and anger toward their parents and all of a sudden, an argument breaks out!